Climate change: Five cheap ways to remove CO2 from the atmosphere

 

As well as rapidly reducing the carbon dioxide that we humans are pumping into the atmosphere in huge amounts, recent scientific assessments of climate change have all suggested that cutting emissions alone will not be enough to keep global temperatures from rising more than 1.5 or 2 degrees C. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and others have all stated that extracting CO2 from the air will be needed if we are to bend the rising temperature curve before the end of this century. These ideas are controversial with some seeing them as a distraction from the pressing business of limiting emissions of CO2. But a new assessment from the US National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine says that some of these “negative emissions technologies” are ready to be deployed, on a large scale, right now. The authors point to the fact that the US Congress has recently passed the 45Q tax rule, which gives a $50 tax credit for every tonne of CO2 that’s captured and stored. So their study highlights some technologies that are available at between $20 and $100 per tonne. This report says that there is a lot of potential for increasing the amount of carbon that is stored in living plants and sediments found in the marshy lands near the sea shore and on the edges of river estuaries. Climate change: Five cheap ways to remove CO2 from the atmosphere

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Why conservatives keep gaslighting the nation about climate change

 

Republican climate rhetoric shifts (again), but the goal remains the same. In recent years, leaders of the Republican Party have become aware that denying the existence of global warming makes them look like idiots. Changes in climate have become obvious, not just to scientists, but to ordinary people — they can be directly measured, with such exotic instruments as a “thermometer.” Majorities of every group except the most conservative Republicans (who will trust their media over their lying eyes) believe it is happening. Denying visible, tangible reality is a dicey business, even for the modern US right. It makes the party look like a death cult. So Republican climate-communication strategy has undergone something of an adjustment. Why conservatives keep gaslighting the nation about climate change

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Weak sun and El Nino events may create a colder and snowier than normal winter season in much of the eastern half of the USA

 

The fast approaching solar minimum and its potential impact on the upcoming winter season By Meteorologist Paul Dorian Overview In the long term, the sun is the main driver of all weather and climate and multi-decadal trends in solar activity can have major impacts on oceanic and atmospheric temperatures. In addition, empirical observations have shown Weak sun and El Nino events may create a colder and snowier than normal winter season in much of the eastern half of the USA

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This Camera Will Take a 1000-Year Photo to Document Climate Change

 

Climate change is arguably the most important challenge ever faced by our species, but the magnitude of the problem and timescales involved can make it difficult to conceptualize in human terms. To this end, the self-described “experimental philosopher” and artist Jonathon Keats has designed a pinhole camera that will take a 1,000-year exposure of Lake Tahoe, which straddles the border of California and Nevada. Keats, whose most recent project was a brain-controlled factory, hopes the cameras will help our ancestors understand climate dynamics and help people envision their long-term impact on the environment today. “We are changing the planet on timescales of a 1,000, 10,000 or even 100,000 years and we’re completely incapable of psychologically appreciating the power that we have,” Keats told me on the phone. “They’re a means to have a sort of cognitive prosthesis, a mechanism for us to be able to see ourselves from that far-future perspective.” Keats’ placed his Millennium Cameras at four locations around Lake Tahoe. Each camera is made of copper and is only 2.75 inches long and 2.25 inches in diameter. Inside the camera is a sheet of 24-karat gold pierced by a small hole. This Camera Will Take a 1000-Year Photo to Document Climate Change

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How thinking like a geologist could help us fight climate change

 

“Society as a whole is unable to think on anything like geologic time scales,” says Marcia Bjornerud. “Or even decadal time scales.” It’s clear that we need to think long-term about climate and the environment, but instead political leaders are constrained by the two-year Congressional cycle and those working in business are beholden to quarterly earnings. Bjornerud is a geologist at Lawrence University in Wisconsin and the author of Timefulness: How Thinking Like a Geologist Can Help Save the World. If people understood the history of the Earth, she argues, “we would perceive our world very differently.” The Verge spoke to Bjornerud about geology’s PR problem, the big questions in the field, and what it means to be “timeful.” This interview has been lightly edited for clarity. I think a lot of educated people don’t quite believe in the geologic past. It’s obscure, they haven’t had much background in it and it doesn’t seem real. How thinking like a geologist could help us fight climate change

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Prince Harry highlights daily threat of climate change on visit to Fiji

SYDNEY, Oct 24 (Reuters) – Prince Harry said on Wednesday climate change was a daily threat for the people of Fiji, and announced scholarships to study the problem, as he toured, with his wife Meghan, the South Pacific nation on the frontline of global warming. The royal couple was mobbed by crowds waving British and Fiji flags on the second day of their visit to the former British colony of some 300 islands, where villages have been moved to higher ground to seek safety from rising seas. “One of the greatest challenges is undoubtedly climate change, and all of you living here are confronted with this threat in your daily lives,” Harry told students at the University of the South Pacific in Fiji’s capital, Suva. “You’re actually experiencing changing weather patterns, ferocious cyclones and rising sea levels, particularly in places such as Tuvalu and Kiribati, and you’ve been living with this for many years, way before the world actually started talking about it.” Fiji, which holds the presidency of COP23, the 23rd annual Conference of the Parties to a landmark U.N. climate agreement, has led a push for the developed world to cut carbon emissions to limit rising temperatures and seas. Prince Harry highlights daily threat of climate change on visit to Fiji

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UN-Backed Fund Pledges $1 Billion for Climate Projects in Developing Countries

 

Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window. The UN-backed Green Climate Fund has pledged $1 billion in new projects and programs for developing countries. The commitment is in prelude to the UN climate talks in December, where member nations will discuss implementing the Paris Agreement, the legally binding document 195 nations signed in 2015, committing them to limiting global warming by reducing emissions. The 19 new projects approved over the four-day meeting in Bahrain (which ended Sunday) include investing in renewable energy in Tonga, transforming financial systems in Africa and South America, and enhancing climate resilience in India’s coastal communities. Other projects address water resources, food security, and electricity grids in developing countries around the world. UN-Backed Fund Pledges $1 Billion for Climate Projects in Developing Countries

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Justice Department asks Supreme Court to toss kids’ climate change lawsuit

WASHINGTON — The Justice Department asked the Supreme Court on Thursday to put a stop to a massive environmental lawsuit, just over a week before it is scheduled to go to trial. The suit was filed in 2015 by a group of young people, ranging in age from 10 to 21, who said the federal government has failed to stop climate change by promoting the use of fossil fuels for more than 50 years. They claim that policy violated their constitutional right to “a climate system capable of sustaining human life.” They seek sharp reductions in carbon dioxide emissions and a national plan for restoring the earth’s energy balance. Despite repeated efforts by the federal government — under both the Obama and Trump administrations — to get the lawsuit tossed out, lower courts have allowed it to go forward. It is now set for 50 days of what the plaintiffs call the trial of the century, beginning Oct. Justice Department asks Supreme Court to toss kids’ climate change lawsuit

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On ’60 Minutes,’ Trump Talks Climate Change

 

President Donald Trump in the Oval Office of the White House earlier this month. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Climate change is probably real, but not caused by man, President Donald Trump said in an interview aired Sunday on CBS’ 60 Minutes. The show interviewed him in the White House last Thursday; the interview aired on CBS Sunday night. The president was previously interviewed by Stahl for 60 Minutes in Trump Tower with his family in 2016, days after the election. On ’60 Minutes,’ Trump Talks Possible Mattis Exit, Climate Change And Kim Jong Un

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