This Camera Will Take a 1000-Year Photo to Document Climate Change

 

Climate change is arguably the most important challenge ever faced by our species, but the magnitude of the problem and timescales involved can make it difficult to conceptualize in human terms. To this end, the self-described “experimental philosopher” and artist Jonathon Keats has designed a pinhole camera that will take a 1,000-year exposure of Lake Tahoe, which straddles the border of California and Nevada. Keats, whose most recent project was a brain-controlled factory, hopes the cameras will help our ancestors understand climate dynamics and help people envision their long-term impact on the environment today. “We are changing the planet on timescales of a 1,000, 10,000 or even 100,000 years and we’re completely incapable of psychologically appreciating the power that we have,” Keats told me on the phone. “They’re a means to have a sort of cognitive prosthesis, a mechanism for us to be able to see ourselves from that far-future perspective.” Keats’ placed his Millennium Cameras at four locations around Lake Tahoe. Each camera is made of copper and is only 2.75 inches long and 2.25 inches in diameter. Inside the camera is a sheet of 24-karat gold pierced by a small hole. This Camera Will Take a 1000-Year Photo to Document Climate Change

thumbnail courtesy of motherboard.vice.com

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